expose-the-light:

Photographer Loves Math, Graphs Her Images

Here are some of the pictures the photographer named Nikki Graziano have captured. Graziano, is a math and photography student at Rochester Institute of Technology, she overlays graphs and their corresponding equations onto her carefully composed photos.

“I wanted to create something that could communicate how awesome math is, to everyone,” she says.

Graziano doesn’t go out looking for a specific function but lets one find her instead. Once she’s got an image she likes, Graziano whips up the numbers and tweaks the function until the graph it describes aligns perfectly with the photograph. See more of her Found Functions series at Nikkigraziano.com.

(via whiskeysoaked)


Related: confidence + enthusiasm d.n.e. intelligence
via indexed

Related: confidence + enthusiasm d.n.e. intelligence

via indexed


ilovecharts:

My first post for Forbes is up! Click through to read.

Please advise.

ilovecharts:

My first post for Forbes is up! Click through to read.

Please advise.


6,941 notes // comments
Reblogged from ilovecharts

Strange Phenomena of the Mind →

maryamahmed:

Déjà Vu - the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself. The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.


Déjà Vécu - is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu. Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. This is also usually accompanied by a very strong feeling of knowing what is going to come next. 


Déjà Visité -  a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. Déjà visité is about spatial and geographical relationships, while déjà vécu is about temporal occurrences. Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote about an experience of this in his book “Our Old Home” in which he visited a ruined castle and had a full knowledge of its layout. He was later able to trace the experience to a poem he had read many years early by Alexander Pope in which the castle was accurately described.


Déjà Senti - Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards. In the words of a person having experienced it: “What is occupying the attention is what has occupied it before, and indeed has been familiar, but has been forgotten for a time, and now is recovered with a slight sense of satisfaction as if it had been sought for. The recollection is always started by another person’s voice, or by my own verbalized thought, or by what I am reading and mentally verbalize; and I think that during the abnormal state I generally verbalize some such phrase of simple recognition as ‘Oh yes—I see’, ‘Of course—I remember’, etc., but a minute or two later I can recollect neither the words nor the verbalized thought which gave rise to the recollection. I only find strongly that they resemble what I have felt before under similar abnormal conditions.”


Jamais Vu - Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before. It is commonly explained as when a person momentarily doesn’t recognize a person, word, or place that they know. Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68 per cent of his guinea pigs showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.


Presque Vu - Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. The term “presque vu” means “almost seen”. The sensation of presque vu can be very disorienting and distracting.

(via cobscookbay)


Oh really, Mr. Raney?
fuckyeahmath

Oh really, Mr. Raney?

fuckyeahmath


2,956 notes // comments
Reblogged from
thedailywhatBrand And Logo Simplification of the Day: “Unevolved Brands” is “a study on brand and logo simplification” by ImJustCreativewhich asks: “How many can you still recognize when simplified to circles?”More here.[yayeveryday.]

thedailywhat
Brand And Logo Simplification of the Day:
Unevolved Brands” is “a study on brand and logo simplification” by ImJustCreativewhich asks: “How many can you still recognize when simplified to circles?”
More here.
[yayeveryday.]


814 notes // comments
Reblogged from thedailywhat
austinkleon:

“Puzzles and Logic Problems” by Ray Fenwick
woodswoodswoods:

Ray Fenwick is my favourite illustrator. He has a totally singular illustrative voice with an unmatched sense of humour, and his lettering chops are second to none. Earlier this year, I managed to put myself down for the last of his Coffee Money Zines, a project whereby you could donate a title, and a small amount of money (to pay for a notebook, some pencils, and enough coffee to keep the man buzzing happily for a day or so) and receive a wee one-off book in return. It was a pretty perfect solution to micro arts-funding. 
Anyway, I finally got round to uploading a few of my favourite pages from the book, which I titled Puzzles & Logic Problems (Intermediate to Advanced). This one in particular makes me happy in ways I can’t begin to articulate. Thanks, Ray.

austinkleon:

“Puzzles and Logic Problems” by Ray Fenwick

woodswoodswoods:

Ray Fenwick is my favourite illustrator. He has a totally singular illustrative voice with an unmatched sense of humour, and his lettering chops are second to none. Earlier this year, I managed to put myself down for the last of his Coffee Money Zines, a project whereby you could donate a title, and a small amount of money (to pay for a notebook, some pencils, and enough coffee to keep the man buzzing happily for a day or so) and receive a wee one-off book in return. It was a pretty perfect solution to micro arts-funding. 

Anyway, I finally got round to uploading a few of my favourite pages from the book, which I titled Puzzles & Logic Problems (Intermediate to Advanced). This one in particular makes me happy in ways I can’t begin to articulate. Thanks, Ray.

(Source: jez-burrows, via austinkleon)


39 notes // comments
Reblogged from jez-burrows
thedailywhatRobots with Feelings

thedailywhat
Robots with Feelings


858 notes // comments
Reblogged from thedailywhat

http://www.stevemiller.net/puretext/ →

Steve Miller, my new BFF, enables unformatted text pasting across all applications via Windows+V instead of three clicks in Word. Hubba hubba.

Also, ctrl+space strips selected text of formatting.

THE THINGS WE LEARN EVERY DAY, PEOPLE!


French words with no English translation →

paperweights : kavalierandclay : samchase :
audreyjayne : lucyphermann : nyahgraphic

Dépaysement: The sensation of being in another country.

La douleur exquise: The heart-wrenching pain of wanting someone you can’t have. Even a Sex in the City episode was named after it!

Chômer: To be unemployed, but because it’s a verb, it makes the state active.

Profiter: To make the most of or take advantage of.

Flâneur: As defined in the book Elegant Wits and Grand Horizontals, it’s “the deliberately aimless pedestrian, unencumbered by any obligation or sense of urgency, who, being French and therefore frugal, wastes nothing, including his time which he spends with the leisurely discrimination of a gourmet, savoring the multiple flavors of his city.”

Esprit d’escalier: The literal translation is staircase wit, but it means to think of a comeback when it’s too late.

Retrouvailles: The happiness of meeting again after a long time.

Sortable: An adjective for someone you can take anywhere without being embarrassed.

Voila/voici: It’s so necessary that we use it all the time. “Voila” literally means “there it is” and “voici means “here it is.”

Empêchement: An unexpected last-minute change of plans. A great excuse without having to be specific


5,456 notes // comments
Reblogged from itsafiasco
thedailywhat
Infographic of the Day: As long as we’re putting stock in the predictions of psychic octopi, here’s another random tentacled pattern that all but guarantees Germany’s World Cup victory.
Suck it, rationality.
[nerdcore.]

thedailywhat

Infographic of the Day: As long as we’re putting stock in the predictions of psychic octopi, here’s another random tentacled pattern that all but guarantees Germany’s World Cup victory.

Suck it, rationality.

[nerdcore.]


931 notes // comments
Reblogged from thedailywhat
curvedwhiteColors in Culture — Information is Beautiful

curvedwhite
Colors in Culture — Information is Beautiful


34 notes // comments
Reblogged from curvedwhite

Google Reader. up-up-down-down-left-right-left-right-B-A. Do it. Now now now. Google + Nintendo FTW!


milkandmorphine : philkMLB Team Names: At Etymological Venn Diagram, by Craig Robinson.

milkandmorphine : philk
MLB Team Names: At Etymological Venn Diagram, by Craig Robinson.


11 notes // comments
Reblogged from philk
OMGZ I want this. It pains me that I don’t understand it all. And I’d forgotten about factorials!!!
UPDATE: It’s only $25 which means it might suck but I still want it. AND HELLLOOOOO here’s our lesson for the day.
Cheat Sheet (included with each clock): 12 - a radical  1 - Legendre’s constant is a mathematical constant occurring in a formula conjectured by Adrien-Marie Legendre to capture the asymptotic behavior of the prime-counting function. Its value is now known to be exactly 1. 2 - A joke in the math world: An infinite number of mathematicians walk into a bar. The first one orders a beer. The second orders half a beer. The third, a quarter of a beer. The bartender says, “You’re all idiots,” and pours two beers. 3 - A unicode character XML “numeric character reference.” 4 - Modular arithmetic, also known as clock arithmetic, is a system of arithmetic for integers, where numbers “wrap around” after they reach a certain value. The modular multiplicative inverse of 2 (mod 7) is the integer /a/ such that 2*/a/ is congruent to 1 modulo 7. 5 - The Golden Mean…reworked a little. 6 - Three factorial (3*2*1=6) 7 -  A repeating decimal that is proven to be exactly equal to 7 with Cauchy’s Convergence Test. 8 - Graphical representation of binary code.  9 -  An example of a base-4 number, which uses the digits 0, 1, 2 and 3 to represent any real number. 10 - A Binomial Coefficient, also known as the choose function. 5 choose 2 is equal to 5! divided by (2!*(5-2)!) 11 - A hexadecimal, or base-16, number.
curvedwhiteGeek Clock by Uncommon Goods

OMGZ I want this. It pains me that I don’t understand it all. And I’d forgotten about factorials!!!

UPDATE: It’s only $25 which means it might suck but I still want it. AND HELLLOOOOO here’s our lesson for the day.

Cheat Sheet (included with each clock):
12 - a radical
1 - Legendre’s constant is a mathematical constant occurring in a formula conjectured by Adrien-Marie Legendre to capture the asymptotic behavior of the prime-counting function. Its value is now known to be exactly 1.
2 - A joke in the math world: An infinite number of mathematicians walk into a bar. The first one orders a beer. The second orders half a beer. The third, a quarter of a beer. The bartender says, “You’re all idiots,” and pours two beers.
3 - A unicode character XML “numeric character reference.”
4 - Modular arithmetic, also known as clock arithmetic, is a system of arithmetic for integers, where numbers “wrap around” after they reach a certain value. The modular multiplicative inverse of 2 (mod 7) is the integer /a/ such that 2*/a/ is congruent to 1 modulo 7.
5 - The Golden Mean…reworked a little.
6 - Three factorial (3*2*1=6)
7 - A repeating decimal that is proven to be exactly equal to 7 with Cauchy’s Convergence Test.
8 - Graphical representation of binary code.
9 - An example of a base-4 number, which uses the digits 0, 1, 2 and 3 to represent any real number.
10 - A Binomial Coefficient, also known as the choose function. 5 choose 2 is equal to 5! divided by (2!*(5-2)!)
11 - A hexadecimal, or base-16, number.

curvedwhite
Geek Clock by Uncommon Goods


14 notes // comments
Reblogged from curvedwhite